Let School and University step out of the confusion – Gabriel Hibon

Let School and University step out of the confusion
Blaise Pascal on the « Three Orders »

It seems at first sight paradoxical (or even a bad joke) to call on stage a thinker from 350 years ago to shed light on some of the confusions which undermine society today. Nonetheless it is worth listening, as will be shown in this short essay, to Blaise Pascal (1623-1662), who, as a mathematician as well as a theologian, put all his talent in discovering the order and the orders, not only of the material world, but of the whole of reality. As mathematician first, his concern was not of a sheer logic, but of the unveiling of the reasons and harmonies, of the figures, of the visible world, hidden but effective. As a theologian, later, Pascal did the same, scrutinizing the Christian Revelation, in particular in the great « oeuvre » he had in view, an Apology of Christian faith. The concern with the order of things shines especially in a fragment, left without title, and yet often called by the editors « Les trois ordres ».

« Proper to the wise man is to find order » says Aristotle in his Metaphysics, book A, « to find order » meaning both finding an unknown but already existing order, and giving an order, ordering an action, in the light of the first order previously discovered. In the Antiquity, as well in the medieval and classic age, the order of the cosmos leads to the order of the human world: from theoria one is brought to praxis. Pascal was passionately in search of such orders everywhere. The fact that he lived in the society of the « Ancien Régime”, structured by the three orders of the « nobles », of the « clergé » and of the “tiers-état », is obviously only a superficial analogy, which cannot help the understanding of his thought. The mathematician allied with the theologian wants to distinguish « orders », which he gives another name in the central point that text this essay considers: « grandeurs ».

Before reading some extracts of this famous text (given in appendix), it is useful to relate how Pascal used to write and stress that he did not think in fragments or aphorisms. Nothing is less contrary to the rhetorical tradition and to his project of composing an apology. Pascal, as Jean Guitton and Emmanuel Martineau explain, wrote continuous discourses of long haul. Nonetheless, Pascal’s family found pieces of cut paper maintained together by a thread, as a collar of pearls, and perhaps even suspended as lines across the room. A list written by Pascal of 27 dossiers was also found, with short titles indicating the themes of his Apology in the making. Research shows that Pascal did not usually write on the first piece of paper he could find. It seem thus that Pascal himself, after writing long pages and letting his thought develop, cut these in much smaller units en assembled them in staples (a sort of card system). Stressing the fact that Pascal, as a strategist, wanted to keep his ideas free for as long as possible, without throwing them in the iron frame of a pre-determined plan, J. Guitton says:

Pascal, toujours soucieux de concilier les contraires, avait voulu réunir les avantages de l’improvisation (qui crée le mouvement de style, faisant ressembler la phrase à la parole) et de l’ordre (lequel résulte d’une adaptation parfaite des moyens à la fin, ce qui exige une réflexion constante. Et cet ordre de ses pensées, il n’avait pas voulu l’arrêter une fois pour toutes, soit parce qu’il ne se croyait point si malade (…) soit plutôt parce qu’il savait que, pour toucher la raison et le cœur, il faut user de plusieurs ordres à la fois.[1]

It is now time to search where this intuition of three orders in human reality comes from. To that concern, the Martineau edition (see appendix) is of high value, since it displays on the same page 37 texts that are dispersed in all other editions. Let us quote the essential extracts:

Tout ce qui est au monde est concupiscence de la chair ou concupiscence des yeux ou orgueil de la vie » : libido sentiendi, libido sciendi, libido dominandi. (…)
Il y a trois ordres de choses: la chair, l’esprit, la volonté.
Les charnels sont les riches, les rois: ils ont pour objet le corps.
Les curieux et savants: ils sont pour objet l’esprit.
Les sages: ils ont pour objet la justice.
Dieu doit régner sur tout et tout se rapporter à lui.
Dans les choses de la chair règne proprement (la) sa concupiscence.
Dans les spirituel<le>s, la curiosité proprement.
Dans la sagesse, l’orgueil proprement. (…)

In the first place Pascal quotes the First Letter of John, chap. 2, with the three dimensions of the world under the power of sin: the three « concupiscences ». Then, through the latin translation (which comes from St Augustine), he puts them as: libido sentiendi, libido sciendi, libido dominandi. This threefold libido, originated in the authority of the Word of God in the New Testament, means originally that the human creature is wounded in the three dimensions of the flesh, vanity and pride.[2] Simultaneously, according to St Augustin (and in fact the whole catholic tradition), the wounded nature of the human creature presupposes nature itself, which is good. This statement allows Pascal to introduce his second threefold division, building his up vision step by step: « Il y a trois ordres de choses: la chair, l’esprit, la volonté. »

Therefore, leaving aside the aspect of evil and sin, inherent to the quote of the 1st Letter of John, Pascal presents a first parallel between libido sentiendi and flesh, between libido sciendi and spirit, and finally between libido dominandi and the will. Flesh, spirit and will are three dimensions of the human creature that Pascal choses to put into full light:

Les charnels sont les riches, les rois : ils ont pour objet le corps.
Les curieux et savants : ils ont pour objet l’esprit.
Les sages : ils ont pour objet la justice.

From that threefold division he widens and extrapolates, seeing in this three dimensions of the creature, in fact a reflection of « trois grandeurs »,[3] three magnitudes:

Tous les corps, le firmament, les étoiles, la terre et ses royaumes, ne valent pas le moindre des esprits; car il connaît tout cela, et soi ; et les corps, rien. —
Tous les corps ensemble et tous les esprits ensemble et toutes leurs productions ne valent pas le moindre mouvement de charité. Cela est d’un ordre infiniment plus élevé .

De tous les corps ensemble, on ne saurait en faire réussir une petite pensée : cela est impossible, et d’un autre ordre. De tous les corps et esprits, on n’en saurait tirer un mouvement de vraie charité, cela est impossible, d’un autre ordre, surnaturel.

Not only does Pascal unveil three dimensions of the whole reality, divided into three magnitudes or « grandeurs », but he stresses that these three are not in the same dimension; these are not simply three human groups. No, these three « grandeurs » are not to be put in the same order, as if the immediate superior magnitude were only a quantitative extension of the inferior: « De tous les corps ensemble, » Pascal continues, « on ne saurait en faire réussir une petite pensée »; and further: « Ce sont trois ordres différant de genre. » A geometric comparison symbolizes this difference of genre, the fact that three orders are incommensurable one with another: to add an infinity of points will never give a two-dimensional plane, and an infinity of planes will never produce a volume. Yet the superior order contains the inferior, as a volume contains the planes, and a plane contains all the points.

The consequence of the heterogeneous nature of one order vis à vis the others is very important both in the thought of Pascal and in the application of it to our contemporary situation, as will be shown further on. The inferior order of the « bodies » cannot measure the order immediately superior to it; it cannot judge it or govern it. Each order has its own logic, proper and inherent, which is not the same as the logic of the other orders: the realm of the bodies is not governed by the same « laws » as the realm of the spirit, let alone the realm of « charity ».

Apparently very abstract, this pascalian vision of one dimension of the bodies, one dimension of the spirits, and one dimension of charity (or wisdom), provides a key to situate the human person, « roseau pensant » not lost in the infinity of the universe.[4] The human being then appears rather at the crossroad of the three dimensions. If the physical universe crushes the human being, were it only symbolically, the unveiling of the three orders puts him, on the contrary, at the heart of a system that makes his situation comprehensible. The human being is the very place where the three dimensions take place and develop their richness. The challenge is therefore to identify in which dimension one is situated and acts. There is, indeed, a challenge, because where there is order, there lies also a risk of disorder, when, for instance the inferior order of the body intends to govern or dominate the superior order of the spirit. This situation is precisely what Pascal calls tyranny: « La tyrannie consiste au désir de domination, universel et hors de son ordre« .[5]

A practical application and illustration of the fecundity of Pascal’s thinking is given, for instance, by Laurent Lafforgue, in a striking actualization, on the occasion of his contribution to the difficulties of the French educational system. Lafforgue identifies several mechanisms that play against a fruitful transmission of culture through instruction at school. The first phenomenon and mechanism is « utilitarism », which is a quality proper to the order of production (thus of the body), and tends to invade school, summoning it to become a useful place for society, capable of producing what society is in need of. School is then submitted to « impératifs économiques à courte vue »,[6] instead of being a separate place where spirits awaken. Further, in a more subtle way, Lafforgue identifies that the « value » itself granted to culture and its transmission became an instrument of success. Yet social success belongs to the order of the body, in Pascal’s terms: to the « grandeurs charnelles ». Social success thus subjugates school to an inferior order. It is necessary, according to Lafforgue, to safeguard the separation of the social elites (with their own way of ascending the social ladder) from the intellectual elites, who belong to another order, the order of spirits.

Actually, Lafforgue continues, the confusion of the social elites with « culture », led to making people hate that culture, without being aware of the fact that culture stands « à une distance infinie ». Acknowledging this sad effect, Lafforgue argues:

Ne serait-ce que dans le but de permettre l’émergence de telles personnalités [de grands intellectuels se souvenant de leurs origines pauvres, comme Camus], et plus fondamentalement parce que l’ordre intellectuel est d’une nature différente de celui de la société, l’école doit ignorer la distinction entre les classes sociales, dispenser à tous les enfants rigoureusement les mêmes enseignements solides et approfondis — indépendamment des conditions économiques dans lesquelles ils vivent —, et leur présenter les mêmes hautes exigences.[7]

This very original analysis of Lafforgue gives a striking example of the relevance of Pascal’s amazing vision. Lafforgue goes further in his analysis, and his statement is worth reading entirely, since this short presentation gives only a small view of it. At a time when the « Humanities » in secondary schools and at university are under great pressure, it is of immense avail to have such an ally in Pascal, genius both in mathematics and in philosophy, and in contemporary intellectuals who know perfectly what they owe to their introduction to the order of the spirit, thanks to school.

Gabriel HIBON

M2 – Anglais

Appendix: text from Pascal « Des trois ordres de choses »

Dans son édition du Discours sur la religion de Pascal, texte universellement connu aujourd’hui sous le titre de « Pensées », Emmanuel Martineau renouvelle de fond en comble l’édition des fragments trouvés à la mort de l’auteur. C’est le texte de cette édition (Fayard/ Armand Colin, 1992) qui est suivi ici, car elle a le grand mérite de restituer les grandes unités des discours écrits d’une pièce par Pascal. Ci-dessous donc l’extrait principal du texte « Des trois ordres de choses » (titre de l’éditeur). Ces passages correspondent aux fragments n° 72 et n° 793 dans l’édition Brunschvicg.

Tout ce qui est au monde est concupiscence de la chair ou concupiscence des yeux ou orgueil de la vie » : libido sentiendi, libido sciendi, libido dominandi. (…)

Il y a trois ordres de choses: la chair, l’esprit, la volonté.

Les charnels sont les riches, les rois: ils ont pour objet le corps.

Les curieux et savants: ils sont pour objet l’esprit.

Les sages: ils ont pour objet la justice.

Dieu doit régner sur tout et tout se rapporter à lui.

Dans les choses de la chair règne proprement (la) sa concupiscence.

Dans les spirituel<le>s, la curiosité proprement.

Dans la sagesse, l’orgueil proprement. (…)

Tous les corps, le firmament, les étoiles, la terre et ses royaumes, ne valent pas le moindre des esprits ; car il connaît tout cela, et soi ; et les corps, rien. — —

Tous les corps ensemble et tous les esprits ensemble et toutes leurs productions ne valent pas le moindre mouvement de charité. Cela est d’un ordre infiniment plus élevé. — —

De tous les corps ensemble, on ne saurait en faire réussir une petite pensée : cela est impossible, et d’un autre ordre. De tous les corps et esprits, on n’en saurait tirer un mouvement de vraie charité, cela est impossible, d’un autre ordre, surnaturel.

La distance infinie des corps aux esprits figure la distance infiniment plus infinie des esprits à la charité car elle est surnaturelle.

Tout l’éclat des grandeurs n’a point de lustre pour les gens qui sont dans les recherches de l’esprit.

La grandeur des gens d’esprit est invisible aux rois, aux riches, aux capitaines, à tous ces grands de chair.

La grandeur de la sagesse, qui n’est nulle sinon de Dieu, est invisible aux charnels et aux gens d’esprit. Ce sont trois ordres différant de genre.

Les grands génies ont leur empire, leur éclat, leur grandeur, leur victoire, leur lustre et n’ont nul besoin de grandeurs charnelles, où elles n’ont pas de rapport. Ils sont vus non des yeux, mais des esprits, c’est assez.

Les saints ont leur empire, leur éclat, leur victoire, leur lustre et n’ont nul besoin de grandeurs charnelles ou spirituelles, où elles n’ont nul rapport, car elles n’y ajoutent ni ôtent. Ils sont vus de Dieu et des anges, et non des corps ni des esprits curieux : Dieu leur suffit.

Archimède, sans éclat, serait en même vénération. Il n’a pas donné de batailles pour les yeux, mais il a fourni à tous les esprits ses inventions. Oh ! qu’il a éclaté aux esprits !
Jésus-Christ, sans biens et sans aucune production au dehors de science, est dans son ordre de sainteté. Il n’a point donné d’invention, il n’a point régné ; mais il a été humble, patient, saint, saint à Dieu, terrible aux démons, sans aucun péché. Oh ! qu’il est venu en grande pompe et en une prodigieuse magnificence, aux yeux du cœur, qui voient la sagesse !

Il eût été inutile à Archimède de faire le prince dans ses livres de géométrie, quoiqu’il le fût.

Il eût été inutile à Notre Seigneur Jésus-Christ, pour éclater dans son règne de sainteté, de venir en roi ; mais il y est bien venu dans l’éclat de son ordre ! Il est bien ridicule de se scandaliser de la bassesse de Jésus-Christ, comme si cette bassesse était du même ordre, duquel est la grandeur qu’il venait faire paraître. Qu’on considère cette grandeur-là dans sa vie, dans sa passion, dans son obscurité, dans sa mort, dans l’élection des siens, dans leur abandonnement, dans sa secrète résurrection, et dans le reste, on la verra si grande, qu’on n’aura pas sujet de se scandaliser d’une bassesse qui n’y est pas.

Mais il y en a qui ne peuvent admirer que les grandeurs charnelles, comme s’il n’y en avait pas de spirituelles ; et d’autres qui n’admirent que les spirituelles, comme s’il n’y en avait pas d’infiniment plus hautes dans la sagesse. — — (…)

      ________________

[1] Jean Guitton, « Préface » aux Pensées, Texte établi par Jacques Chevalier. Paris: Le Livre de Poche, 1962.

[2] See: « For all that is in the world, the lust of the flesh and the lust of the eyes and the pride of life, is not of the Father but is of the world » (1st Letter of John 2, 16) in The Holy Bible. Revised Standard Version of the Bible. San Francisco: Ignatius Press, 2006.

[3] The word « grandeur » must not be translated « greatness », that which would deprive the all reasoning of its core signification. « Grandeur » means rather « dimension », « order of magnitude ». The analogy here is clearly drawn from mathematics.

[4] One remembers the famous meditation of Pascal on the human being, as it were stuck between the infinite great and the infinite small, concluding: « Le silence éternel de ces espaces infinis m’effraie ». The human being can feel its nothingness in this situation. Yet it goes in this aspect only over the physical universe.

[5] Edition Brunschwicg, N° 332 (italics added).

[6] See: L’école victime de la confusion des ordres, sur : www.laurentlafforgue.org/textes/EcoleTroisOrdres.pdf

[7] Ibid.


Vous aimerez aussi...

Laisser un commentaire

Votre adresse de messagerie ne sera pas publiée. Les champs obligatoires sont indiqués avec *